Saturday, May 13, 2006

yellow balloon flying away

I just finished reading "The Singing Fish" by Peter Markus.
star rating?
I give it a Milky Way

and then what happened was this (on page 68)
"The moon rose like a balloon running away from the hand of a little girl who wanted to know what it would be like to see this balloon rise up and up until, in the sun's heat, it would get so close up, it would get so heated up, that it would break. It's true that the moon was rising up and away from the hand, from the head, of a girl, Girl, who did not eralize that the moon could actually break. When the moon in its rising up, when the moon got too up close to the sun, it was too late for us brothers to stop it from breaking. In the sun's molten light, in this blast furnace fire, the moon, it shattered into a billion pieces. Each broken piece became a star."

Fine example, I think, of writing without fear, yeah?

In my memory essay, I wrote a line "Yellow balloon flying away" and then I read this book and I thought, 'Wow, Markus wrote that same moment that I wrote.'

And it made my stomach tingle in a way like when you've just ordered dinner and at *that moment* you realize that you're really hungry.

I *love* that he wrote the moment of losing a balloon (such a small, simple, ridiculously painful moment) and made it beautiful.

I sure do love the prose.

A while ago I posted a little reading list that had been recommended to me by one Tyehimba Jess.

After reading an earlier Peter Markus book, "The Moon is a Lighthouse," I emailed Peter and asked him for some reading materials:

  • Noy Holland, "The Spectacle of the Body"
  • Rudy Wilson, "The Red Truck"
  • Ben Markus, "The Age of Wire and String"
  • Gertrude Stein, "Ida and To Do"
  • Victoria Redel, "Where the Road Bottoms Out"
  • Gary Lutz, "Stories in the Worst Way"
  • Dawn Raffel, "In the Year of Long Division"
  • David Markson, "Wittgenstein's Mistress"
Time for a song?
Yes



PS: There are new literary links! (look to the right of the screen)

Check out Opium Magazine, Elimae, and Sweet Fancy Moses.

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